Fantasy Menagerie




hadlais:

blatherversity:


[x]

Sea Slicks
Whenever there is an oil spill in the world’s oceans, a sea slick is “born”. Countless animals lose their lives to the thick, clinging clutches of oil, dying miserable, wretchedly drawn-out deaths. Sea slicks are born of the lost souls of those animals and the sludge that bound and choked the life from them. As such, sea slicks are always referred to as “they” and “them” rather than “it”, and it’s said that if you chance upon a sea slick near the surface, their soft, melancholy vocalisations carry the haunting remnants of sea birds and the whispers of shoals of fish.
Despite their fearsome appearances, they are very much docile creatures, preferring to near-constantly swim through the depths and the quiet of the sea they were robbed from. Sea slicks are amortal, being unable to die, as they were never truly what we would call “alive” to begin with. Over time, however, sea slicks do disintegrate, usually over the span of several years, losing pieces of semi-sentient oil to the surface waters.
Ambitious wixes track sea slicks to gather these pieces, as they make especially valuable, durable invisibility cloaks capable of protecting wearers from even the deadliest of spells.

I love this! Modern, industrial fantasy creatures. Wow, so cool!

hadlais:

blatherversity:

[x]

Sea Slicks

Whenever there is an oil spill in the world’s oceans, a sea slick is “born”. Countless animals lose their lives to the thick, clinging clutches of oil, dying miserable, wretchedly drawn-out deaths. Sea slicks are born of the lost souls of those animals and the sludge that bound and choked the life from them. As such, sea slicks are always referred to as “they” and “them” rather than “it”, and it’s said that if you chance upon a sea slick near the surface, their soft, melancholy vocalisations carry the haunting remnants of sea birds and the whispers of shoals of fish.

Despite their fearsome appearances, they are very much docile creatures, preferring to near-constantly swim through the depths and the quiet of the sea they were robbed from. Sea slicks are amortal, being unable to die, as they were never truly what we would call “alive” to begin with. Over time, however, sea slicks do disintegrate, usually over the span of several years, losing pieces of semi-sentient oil to the surface waters.

Ambitious wixes track sea slicks to gather these pieces, as they make especially valuable, durable invisibility cloaks capable of protecting wearers from even the deadliest of spells.

I love this! Modern, industrial fantasy creatures. Wow, so cool!


50,679 notes ∞ Reblog 2 months ago
fatbrides:

Nicolas Flamel

fatbrides:

Nicolas Flamel


8 notes ∞ Reblog 4 months ago

"Everyone thinks of [fairy tales] in terms of poisoned apples and glass coffins, and forgets that they represent girls who walked into dark forests and remade them into their own reflections."

-Seanan McGuire, “Indexing”  (via owls-love-tea)

(Source: dapuritoyo)


14,353 notes ∞ Reblog 5 months ago
nataliakoptseva:

Eugene Delacroix. Illustration for a poem by Johann Goethe “Faust”. Mephistopheles. Lithography

nataliakoptseva:

Eugene Delacroix. Illustration for a poem by Johann Goethe “Faust”. Mephistopheles. Lithography


52 notes ∞ Reblog 5 months ago

carrionlust:

Boleslaw Biegas with fantastically bizarre vampire themed paintings. Where the traditional depictions of vampires portray humanoid bat like creatures, Biegas carried through a wild bestiary of interpretations… insect vampires, winged camel vampires, elephant vampires, and so on.
Weird shit, eh?
See more Biegas artwork at this site.


53 notes ∞ Reblog 6 months ago

(Source: floranymphea)


311 notes ∞ Reblog 6 months ago
necrosexlover:

Frank Frazetta - Tempest Witch
 

necrosexlover:

Frank Frazetta - Tempest Witch

 


394 notes ∞ Reblog 6 months ago
saveflowers1:

Art by Willy Pogany (1908) - “Faust.”

saveflowers1:

Art by Willy Pogany (1908) - “Faust.”


70 notes ∞ Reblog 6 months ago

fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Aesop's fables' a new translation by V. S. Vernon Jones, with an introduction by G. K. Chesterton and illustrations by Arthur Rackham. Published 1912 by William Heinemann, London.

See the complete book here.


1,056 notes ∞ Reblog 6 months ago

17 notes ∞ Reblog 7 months ago
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